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Robots

robots, remote controlled platforms, autonomous robots, robot
 
 

   

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  1. Pololu 3pi Robot

    Pololu 3pi Robot

    $108.55

    The Pololu 3pi robot is a complete, high-performance mobile platform featuring two micro metal gearmotors, five reflectance sensors, an 8×2 character LCD, a buzzer, and three user pushbuttons, all connected to a C-programmable ATmega168 microcontroller. Capable of speeds exceeding 3 feet per second, 3pi is a great first robot for ambitious beginners and a perfect second robot for those looking to move up from non-programmable or slower beginner robots.

    The 3pi robot is designed to excel in line-following and maze-solving competitions. It has a small size (9.5 cm/3.7" diameter, 83 g/2.9 oz without batteries) and takes just four AAA cells (not included), while a unique power system runs the motors at a constant 9.25 V independent of the battery charge level. The regulated voltage allows the 3pi to reach speeds up to 100 cm/second while making precise turns and spins that don’t vary with the battery voltage.

    The 3pi robot makes a great platform for people with C programming experience to learn robotics, and it is a fun environment for ambitious beginners to learn C programming. At its heart is an Atmel ATmega168 microcontroller running at 20 MHz with 16KB of flash program memory and 1KB data memory, enough space to run complicated programs. An extra 512 bytes of persistent EEPROM memory is provided on the microcontroller for data logging or long-term learning applications. The popular, free GNU C/C++ compiler works perfectly with the 3pi, Atmel’s AVR Studio provides a comfortable development environment, and an extensive set of libraries provided by Pololu makes it a breeze to interface with all of the integrated hardware. The 3pi is also compatible with the popular Arduino development platform. We provide a number of sample programs to show how to use the various 3pi components, as well as how to perform more complex behaviors such as line following and maze solving.

    A Video Introduction to the 3pi

    To see for yourself what the 3pi is like, please take a look at the video below, which introduces its basic features and operation.


    More Pictures and Videos of the 3pi Robot:

    The following video shows a 3pi prototype autonomously solving a line maze. It first runs through the maze executing a search algorithm, keeping track of which way it is turning at intersections and discarding paths that lead to dead ends. Once it finds the end, which is marked by a solid black circle, it determines from memory the best path from start to finish and on subsequent runs aggressively drives that shortest path. This is just one example of what the 3pi is capable of.


    This unedited video shows six 3pi prototypes simultaneously participating in a line-following exhibition at a local robotics competition. The robots were all programmed independently. Last one remaining on the line wins!


    Click here for even more 3pi videos!

    Dimensions

    Size: 3.7" diameter

    General specifications

    Processor: ATmega168
    Motor driver: TB6612FNG
    Motor channels: 2
    User I/O lines: 21
    Minimum operating voltage: 3 V2
    Maximum operating voltage: 7 V2
    Maximum PWM frequency: 80 kHz
    Reverse voltage protection?: Yes
    External programmer required?: Yes

    Notes:

    1
    Digital I/O lines PD0 and PD1 are available; two more analog inputs and one analog/digital pin can be made available by removing jumpers and disabling special features of the board.
    2
    Designed for use with 4 x AAA NiMH or Alkaline cells. A step-up regulator boosts the motor voltage to 9.25 V.

    Documentation and other information

    Pololu 3pi Robot User’s Guide (Printable PDF: 3pi.pdf)

    User's guide for the Pololu 3pi Robot.

    Pololu AVR C/C++ Library User’s Guide (Printable PDF: pololu_avr_library.pdf)

    Information about installing and using the C/C++ libraries provided for use with Pololu products.

    Pololu AVR Library Command Reference (Printable PDF: avr_library_commands.pdf)

    A reference to commands provided in the Pololu C/C++ and Arduino libraries for the AVR.

    Building Line Following and Line Maze Courses (Printable PDF: building_line_courses.pdf)

    Step-by-step instructions for building your own line-following courses.

    Programming Orangutans and the 3pi Robot from the Arduino Environment (Printable PDF: orangutan_arduino.pdf)

    Guide to making the Arduino IDE compatible with the 3pi robot and the Orangutan SV-168, Orangutan LV-168, and Baby Orangutan B robot controllers, including Arduino libraries for interfacing with the all of their on-board hardware.

    Sample Project: 3pi Wall Follower (Printable PDF: 3pi_wall_follower.pdf)

    Sample robot project for enhancing a 3pi robot to drive around objects on its left.

    Sample Project: RC 3pi (Printable PDF: rc_3pi.pdf)

    Sample robot project for making the 3pi radio controlled.

    Application Note: Using the Motor Driver on the 3pi Robot and Orangutan Robot Controllers (Printable PDF: motor_driver_application_note.pdf)

    Detailed information about the 3pi Robot, Orangutan SV-168 and LV-168, and Baby Orangutan B motor drivers, including truth tables and sample code.

    3pi Robot Videos

    Various videos of the Pololu 3pi robot in action.


    File downloads

    3pi quick-start sheet and schematic (66k pdf)
    A print-out of this quick-start sheet is included in with each shipped 3pi robot.
    3pi simplified schematic diagram (40k pdf)

    Pololu AVR Library (source and compiled code). (719k zip)

    Pololu 3pi Robot guia de usuario (2483k pdf)
    A Spanish version of our Pololu 3pi robot’s user’s guide provided by customer Jaume B.
    Line Maze Algorithm Presentation (505k pdf)
    A detailed presentation on teaching a robot to solve a non-looped line maze written by customer (and robotics professor) R. Vannoy.
    Learn More
  2. 3pi Expansion Kit with Cutouts - Black

    3pi Expansion Kit with Cutouts - Black

    $21.75

    This kit gives you everything you need to add a second level to your 3pi robot. The black printed circuit board matches the color of the 3pi and has cutouts that let you view the LCD below and make it easier to reach the power button, reset button, and programming header.

    Overview

    This kit includes a round printed circuit board (PCB) with holes spaced on a 0.100" grid, one extended 2×7 male header, two extended 2×1 male headers, a 2×7 female header, two 2×1 female headers, four 7/8" nylon spacers, four 1-1/4" screws, and four nuts.

    The expansion PCB matches diameter of the 3pi chassis and mounts just above the tops of the wheels using the four included screws and spacers. Once assembled, the PCB has electrical connections to the base that allow you interface your own electronics with the 3pi robot, which is sold separately. These connections give you access to the ATmega168’s free/jumpered pins, as well as to the three on-board voltages: VBAT (battery voltage), VCC (regulated 5 V), and VBST (regulated 9.25 V that is supplied to the motors). Additionally, the expansion PCB connects to the base’s power button and battery charge port, allowing you to add your own power buttons and charge ports.

    This expansion kit’s PCB has cutouts that allow you to view the LCD below and access the power button, reset button, and ISP programming header. If you want additional I/O lines or extra prototyping space and you do not need the LCD, please consider the version of the expansion kit without cutouts, which replaces the LCD.

    The expansion PCB is designed to provide plenty of prototyping space for your components. It has room for one 0.6" 40-pin DIP (dual in-line package) component, such as the ATmega32 in the picture below, or for numerous smaller DIP components. The prototyping space extends all the way to the edge of the PCB, allowing you convenient points to mount a variety of sensors such as bumper switches and range-finders. The silkscreen shows how the pads are connected; the electrical connections are on the bottom side. You can cut the copper traces on that bottom side (with a sharp knife or a small rotary tool cutoff wheel) if some of the pre-made connections interfere with your desired layout.

    The two unused I/O lines on the 3pi’s microcontroller are its serial transmit and receive lines. This means that you can add a second microcontroller or microcontroller board, such as a Baby Orangutan, Basic Stamp, or Arduino Nano, to the expansion PCB. This second microcontroller would deal with all of the sensors and additional hardware on the expansion PCB and control the base via serial commands. We have released a serial slave program for the 3pi base that turns it into a serially controlled platform that can be driven at the whim of another microcontroller.

    Assembly

    The supplied header pins allow you to establish all of the necessary electrical connections between the expansion PCB and the 3pi base. We recommend that you fully assemble the 3pi and its expansion kit before you solder anything. This will ensure that once everything is soldered in, the expansion platform will align properly with the base. We suggest that you assemble your expansion kit in the following order:

    1) Place the 2×7 female header and one of the 2×1 female headers into the proper holes in the 3pi base as shown below (see the yellow rectangles).

    2) Insert the long ends of the 2×7 and one 2×1 extended male header into these female headers, and insert an extended 2×1 male header into the battery charge port. Place the expansion PCB so the tops of these male headers seat in the proper places, as marked by the rectangles in the picture below. Note that the expansion PCB mounts with the silkscreen facing up.

    3) Slip a nylon spacer between the base and the expansion PCB so that it lines up with the mounting hole on the base. Insert a screw from the underside of the base up through the base’s mounting hole, the spacer, and the mounting hole on the expansion board. Holding the head of the screw against the base, twist the nut onto the other side, but don’t tighten it all the way. Repeat this process for the three remaining screws, and then tighten them together so that the expansion PCB is aligned well with the base.

    4) With the screws holding everything in place, you can now solder the female headers to the base and the male headers to the expansion PCB. Once everything is soldered in, you can remove the screws and pull the expansion PCB off of the base; it should look like the one in the picture below.

    After assembly you will have a single 2×1 female header left over. You can use this to create your own battery charge port on the expansion PCB.

    Note: This product is a kit designed to augment the 3pi robot (sold separately). Assembly of this kit requires soldering.

    Learn More
  3. 3pi Expansion Kit without Cutouts - Black

    3pi Expansion Kit without Cutouts - Black

    $21.75

    This kit gives you everything you need to add a second level to your 3pi robot. In this version, the LCD pins are brought up to the expansion board from the base via extended headers for your own custom use. This black printed circuit board matches the color of the 3pi and can also serve as a general-purpose round prototyping board.

    Overview

    This kit includes a round printed circuit board (PCB) with holes spaced on a 0.100" grid, two extended 2×7 male headers, two extended 2×1 male headers, a 2×7 female header, two 2×1 female headers, four 7/8" nylon spacers, four 1-1/4" screws, and four nuts.

    The expansion PCB matches the diameter of the 3pi chassis and mounts just above the tops of the wheels using the four included screws and spacers. Once assembled, the PCB has electrical connections to the base that allow you interface your own electronics with the 3pi robot, which is sold separately. These connections give you access to the ATmega168’s LCD pins, ISP programming pins, and free/jumpered pins, as well as to the three on-board voltages: VBAT (battery voltage), VCC (regulated 5 V), and VBST (regulated 9.25 V that is supplied to the motors). Additionally, the expansion PCB connects to the base’s power button and battery charge port, allowing you to add your own power buttons and charge ports.

    Note: This expansion kit replaces the 3pi’s LCD. If you want to preserve the LCD, please consider the version of the expansion kit with cutouts. This version of the kit might be preferable to those who want additional I/O lines or extra prototyping space and do not need the LCD. A wireless module, for instance, might need the I/O and make the on-board LCD unnecessary if data is relayed to a nearby PC.

    The expansion PCB is designed to provide plenty of prototyping space for your components. It has room for two 0.6" 40-pin DIP (dual in-line package) components, such as the ATmega32 in the picture below, or for numerous smaller DIP components. The prototyping space extends all the way to the edge of the PCB, allowing you convenient points to mount a variety of sensors such as bumper switches and range-finders. The silkscreen shows how the pads are connected; the electrical connections are on the bottom side. You can cut the copper traces on that bottom side (with a sharp knife or a small rotary tool cutoff wheel) if some of the pre-made connections interfere with your desired layout.

    Two of the unused I/O lines on the 3pi’s microcontroller are its serial transmit and receive lines. This means that you can add a second microcontroller or microcontroller board, such as a Baby Orangutan, Basic Stamp, or Arduino Nano, to the expansion PCB. This second microcontroller would deal with all of the sensors and additional hardware on the expansion PCB and control the base via serial commands. We have released a serial slave program for the 3pi base that turns it into a serially controlled platform that can be driven at the whim of another microcontroller.

    Assembly

    The supplied header pins allow you to establish all of the necessary electrical connections between the expansion PCB and the 3pi base. We recommend that you fully assemble the 3pi and its expansion kit before you solder anything. This will ensure that once everything is soldered in, the expansion platform will align properly with the base. We suggest that you assemble your expansion kit in the following order:

    1) Place the 2×7 female header and one of the 2×1 female headers into the proper holes in the 3pi base as shown below (see the yellow rectangles).

    2) Insert the long ends of one 2×7 and one 2×1 extended male header into these female headers, and insert an extended 2×1 male header into the battery charge port. Lastly, remove the LCD and insert an extended 2×7 male header into the LCD port. Place the expansion PCB so the tops of these male headers seat in the proper places, as marked by the rectangles in the picture below. Note that the expansion PCB mounts with the silkscreen facing up.

    3) Slip a nylon spacer between the base and the expansion PCB so that it lines up with the mounting hole on the base. Insert a screw from the underside of the base up through the base’s mounting hole, the spacer, and the mounting hole on the expansion board. Holding the head of the screw against the base, twist the nut onto the other side, but don’t tighten it all the way. Repeat this process for the three remaining screws, and then tighten them together so that the expansion PCB is aligned well with the base.

    4) With the screws holding everything in place, you can now solder the female headers to the base and the male headers to the expansion PCB. Once everything is soldered in, you can remove the screws and pull the expansion PCB off of the base; it should look like the one in the picture below.

    After assembly you will have a single 2×1 female header left over. You can use this to create your own battery charge port on the expansion PCB.

    Note: This product is a kit designed to augment the 3pi robot (sold separately). Assembly of this kit requires soldering.

    Learn More
 
 

   

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